The UCSD Judaic Studies Program presents:

The Herman Wouk Chair of Modern Jewish Studies Lecture:  The Presence of the Past in Modern Jewish Literature

by Dara Horn, Novelist and Literary Scholar
Harvard University

Description: What happens to days that disappear? Or languages, or people?  Is it possible to record everything in our lives, and if it were, would we want to?  Drawing on historical sources and her own creative work, Dara Horn will discuss today's technological expectations and their ancient roots, taking us on a journey to an Egyptian room full of dead people's love letters to uncover the meaning of storytelling in Jewish life, and its connection to free will and destiny.

Thursday, May 7th, 2015
8:00 pm
Faculty Club, Atkinson Pavilion
UC San Diego
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Dara Horn Dara Horn was born in New Jersey in 1977 and received her Ph.D. in comparative literature from Harvard University in 2006, studying Hebrew and Yiddish. In 2007 she was chosen by Granta magazine as one of 20 “Best Young American Novelists.” Her first novel, In the Image, published by W.W. Norton when she was 25, received a 2003 National Jewish Book Award, the 2002 Edward Lewis Wallant Award, and the 2003 Reform Judaism Fiction Prize. Her second novel, The World to Come, published by W.W. Norton in 2006, received the 2006 National Jewish Book Award for Fiction, the 2007 Harold U. Ribalow Prize, was selected as an Editors’ Choice in The New York Times Book Review and as one of the Best Books of 2006 by The San Francisco Chronicle, and has been translated into eleven languages. Her third novel, All Other Nights, published in 2009 by W.W. Norton, was selected as an Editors’ Choice in The New York Times Book Review and was one of Booklist’s 25 Best Books of the Decade. In 2012, her nonfiction e-book The Rescuer was published by Tablet magazine and became a Kindle bestseller. Her fourth novel, A Guide for the Perplexed, was published by W.W. Norton in September 2013, and was selected as one of Booklist‘s Best Books of 2013 and was longlisted for the Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction. She has taught courses in Jewish literature and Israeli history at Sarah Lawrence College and City University of New York, and currently holds the Gerald Weinstock Visiting Professorship in Jewish Studies at Harvard, where she teaches Yiddish and Hebrew literature. She has lectured at over two hundred universities and cultural institutions throughout North America, in Israel and in Australia. She lives in New Jersey with her husband and four children.