The UCSD Judaic Studies Program presents:

Armageddon and the Roman VIth Legion Ferrata: New Excavations at Legio, Israel, and Early Jewish-Christian-Roman Relations

by Matthew J. Adams, PhD.
Dorot Director, W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research, Jerusalem (begin June 2014)

Description: In the late 1st and early 2nd Centuries CE, dangerous Jewish (and incipient Christian) rebels were causing problems for the Roman Empire in Palestine. Though the First Revolt resulted in the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem in 70 CE and in the establishment of a permanent base of the Xth Legion there, these groups continued to harass their overlords. Historical sources indicate that the Roman VIth Legion Ferrata was deployed to Palestine in the early 2nd Century CE to provide support for the Xth, a sure sign that the rebels were acting up again. The VIth Legion established their base somewhere near Megiddo, but its exact location has been a long-standing question in the archaeology of the period. Using historical and geographical sources, aerial photography, and remote sensing, the Jezreel Valley Regional Project searched for potential locations of the elusive fortress. In 2013, one of these locations was tested by excavation, providing the first glimpse of a 2nd Century Roman military base yet uncovered in the entire eastern Empire. Together with the early Christian Prayer hall discovered in 2005 in the adjacent Jewish village of Caparcotani, the new excavations have new implications for Jewish-Christian-Roman relations and for the composition of the Book of Revelation.

Thursday, February 13th,2014
8:00 pm
Green Room, RIMAC
UC San Diego
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Matthew J. Adams Matthew received his PhD in History from Pennsylvania State University, specializing in Egyptology and Near Eastern Archaeology. While his primary research focus is on periods of early urbanization and state formation in both Egypt and the Levant, he has broad regional and disciplinary research interests in the Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds. In 2009, Matthew initiated the Jezreel Valley Regional Project (JVRP), a long-term, multi-disciplinary survey and excavation project investigating the history of human activity in the Jezreel Valley from the Paleolithic through the Ottoman period. In addition to directing the JVRP, he is also a member of the Penn State excavations at Mendes, Egypt, and the Tel Aviv University Megiddo Expedition. He is also President of the non-profit organization, American Archaeology Abroad, and in June, he will take over as the Dorot Director of the W.F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research in Jerusalem.